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The Special-est Specialties

Aug 29, 2014

th397JSKVOA couple of recent Medscape reports reveal some interesting—and sometimes problematic—truths about how different medical specialties are incentivized by the nation's healthcare system. The Medscape Residents Salary and Debt Report for 2014 and Medscape’s latest physician compensation report each look at salaries for 25 medical specialties. What’s surprising is that, with a couple of exceptions, there’s relatively little correlation between the best-paid residencies and the best-paid physician specialties. The best-paid residencies, according to Medscape, are in critical care ($65,000 average annual salary); radiology ($63,000); pulmonary medicine ($60,000); gastroenterology ($60,000); and oncology ($59,000). The best-paid physicians, Medscape says, are in orthopedics ($413,000 average annual salary); cardiology ($351,000); urology ($348,000); gastroenterology ($348,000); and radiology ($340,000).

Healthcare Earnings: Different Fates in Different States

Aug 27, 2014

Different healthcare professionals have different earnings outlooks. A big takeaway from the National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates report for 2013: When it comes to earnings in the healthcare industry, the statistics are all over the map. And that’s true literally as well as metaphorically. According to the report issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, states that have high-paid healthcare providers in one occupational area or specialty aren’t necessarily as generous to health professionals in another. The survey looks broadly at four categories of frontline healthcare providers—doctors, registered nurses, physician’s assistants, and nurse practitioners—as well as at practitioners in various specialties and subspecialties. But looking at the big picture, what surprises most is that there is little overlap between states that are the most hospitable (i.e. pay the most) to doctors and states that offer high salaries to practitioners in the other three categories.

10 states with the highest paid NPs

Aug 25, 2014

The national estimated wage average for nurse practitioners is $95,070, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' May 2013 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates report. The following are the top 10 states with the highest average annual estimated wages for nurse practitioners... Read more at Becker's Hospital Review

2 Steps To Being More Likable During Interviews

Aug 25, 2014

Often times, when you’ve been job searching for a long time, it can be easy to lose confidence in yourself and your abilities. As a result, you will either overcompensate and brag about yourself, or you undercompensate and get very humble and insecure... Read more at Careerealism

Medical Residency: By the Numbers

Aug 25, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7359" align="alignleft" width="150"]Residents weigh in. Residents weigh in.[/caption] The life of a medical resident is fraught with financial perils and career-defining forks in the road. The online healthcare professionals website Medscape just released its annual Residents Salary and Debt Report for 2014, highlighting some of the issues residents face in terms of earnings, debt, and job satisfaction. The annual survey—the 2014 report is based on data collected in June and July—sees Medscape invite physicians from across the country to participate in an online questionnaire. Respondents must be medical residents enrolled in a program somewhere in the United States, and the latest report includes data from 1,279 residents representing 25 different specialties. Here are some of the interesting takeaways from this year’s report, providing us a glimpse into the milieu of today’s resident, and how it has changed (or maybe how it hasn’t changed) from years past.

62 Interview Questions People Said Were Their Favorites

Aug 22, 2014

A contest for people to submit their favorite interview questions yielded the interesting, the odd, the useful, the insightful, and the obscene. They included such questions as: “What is your favorite palindrome?” and “Why did America stop selling War Bonds?” And some I can’t publish without washing my own mouth out with soap... Read more at ERE

10 states with the highest paid physicians

Aug 22, 2014

The national estimated wage average for physicians and surgeons is $191,880, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' May 2013 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates report. The following are the top 10 states with the highest average estimated wages for physicians and surgeons... Read more at Becker's Hospital Review

10 states with the highest paid RNs

Aug 22, 2014

The national estimated wage average for registered nurses is $68,910, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' May 2013 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates report. The following are the top 10 states with the highest average annual estimated wages for registered nurses... Read more at Becker's Hospital Review

The Best Jobs In Health Care In 2014

Aug 22, 2014

Annual Median Salary: $87,000 Projected job growth: 62%[note: salary and job growth numbers are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics] Read more at Forbes

The Dark Secret Behind the Physician Shortage

Aug 22, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7303" align="alignnone" width="570"]Medical school graduates are expected to exceed available residency positions by 2015. Medical school graduates are expected to exceed available residency positions by 2015.[/caption] The terrible secret behind the nation’s physician shortage is that it has nothing to do with a shortage of aspiring physicians. Several studies have chronicled the dimensions of the physician crisis in the U.S., a shortage of doctors, across all specialties, that is only expected to become more pronounced over the next decade. But according to the Association of American Medical Colleges, med-school enrollments will have increased by 30 percent over 2002 statistics by the year 2017—and that figure doesn’t account for the growing phenomenon of students who study overseas, then come back home to practice. The problem is that there are not enough residencies to accommodate the output of med-school graduates—the AAMC predicts grads will exceed residency positions by 2015. The reason for this appears to be twofold. It’s been said that Medicare cuts have drastic effects on the number of residencies. Congress, via Medicare, subsidizes most residency slots, to the tune of around $10 billion every year. And Congress froze the number of residency positions back in 1997, the result being that there have been only a few thousand more slots added to the nation’s total in the years since.